ARCHITECT AND INTERIOR DESIGNER: PETER BEHRENS

Peter Behrens

German Architect and Interior Designer Peter Behrens (1868-1940 ) was a proponent of artist involvement in many area, and his design career was one of continuing simplifications, moving from a classical vocabulary to modern vocabulary that yet retained a classical basis.

In addition to designing buildings and interiors, he was an educator and an artist producing paintings and woodcuts. As artistic advisor to the giant German electric company AEG, he created not only architecture and interiors, but also graphic design and wide array of product designs.

Peter Behrens

 

Apprentices in Behrens Berlin office included three young men who would be largely responsible for the modern movement : Walter Gropius , Ludwig Mies ven Rohe , and Le Corbusie . Among Behrens works are the 1909 AEG Turbine Factory in Berlin (Fig. 21-6 ) , a no-nonsense utilitarian structure of brick and steel that still echoes the form and bearing of a classical temple , and the 1912 German Embassy in St.Petersburg, Russia , on which the young Mies worked.

SOURCE LINK: http://interiordesigningweb.com/architect-and-interior-designer-peter-behrens/

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THE EVOLUTION IN INTERIORS FROM TWENTIETH-CENTURY ARCHITECTURE (MODERNISM)

Architecture and Interiors: Twentieth-Century

The central changes in living conditions in the twentieth century were the results of new technology.

The central change in society, meanwhile, was progress toward democracy and equality, progress seen in design as well as in government. And the central artistic development of the century – a development that progressed hand in hand with technology and democracy – was modernism.

Modernism

Modernism

Modernism was not the century’s only expression, but it was the one against which others were measured. It was not the only movement, but all others were judged by their relationships to it. As precursors to it in some cases, as reactions against it in others, as either participants in it or forces outside it. Many of modernism’s enthusiasts saw it as more than a style. In its most extreme example, modernism rejected all ornamentation, all allusions to earlier design, and all past styles.

Modernism was seen as having grown naturally from function and therefore to have abolished the very concept of style. Today we can see that modernism was not as unified, logical, or objective as its advocates once thought. It is a style, after all, but one of rare importance and continuing vitality.

SOURCE LINK: http://interiordesigningweb.com/the-evolution-in-interiors-from-twentieth-century-architecture-modernism/